One of the many annual processions made by the Doge in company with his government, various attendants, and the scuole grandi was the procession to the convent and church at San Zaccaria. The route of this procession is partially documented, so I have taken photographs of what members of the procession would have seen as they made their way from the Basilica of San Marco to the convent, only a few streets away. In keeping with the idea that a procession is a liminal experience for the participants, the spaces traversed here embody a number of liminal concepts, particularly bridges and thresholds.

Although the procession was an Easter event, I took my photographs on All Souls' Day at the beginning of November. The combination of the half holiday and a dense fog meant that there were many less people than usual to block the sightlines.


1. Basilica San Marco and Piazza
2. Piazza and Clock Tower
3. Campiello of Basilica San Marco
4. Calle Canonica
5. Rio di Palazzo
6. Ponte Canonica
7. Ponte Canonica, Rio di Palazzo, and Ponte Sospiri
8. Campo S.S. Filippo e Giacomo
9. Campo S.S. Filippo e Giacomo
10. Salizzada San Provolo
11. Ponte San Provolo
12. Entry to Campo San Zaccaria
13. San Zaccaria
14. San Zaccaria and former convent
15. San Zaccaria
16. View back across Campo


1. Basilica San Marco and Piazza
The procession exits the church by the front door.

2. Piazza and Clock Tower
The procession turns to the right, and faces the clock tower.

3. Campiello of Basilica San Marco
The procession turns right again (so that it is facing east), so that the side of the Basilica is on the right. Facing the viewer is the Patriarchal Palace. The exit at left is the Calle Canonica.

4. Calle Canonica
The procession wends its way eastward along the side of the Patriarch's Palace.

5. Rio di Palazzo
The procession turns south, behind the Patriarch's Palace, and walks down a fondamenta along the Rio di Palazzo. When it reaches the steps, it ascends them and turns left onto the bridge.

6. Ponte Canonica
The procession crosses the bridge, going east.

7. Ponte Canonica, Rio di Palazzo, and Ponte Sospiri
If the members of the procession break discipline and look to the right as they cross the bridge, they will be able to look down the canal to the Bacino. In a reverse of the customary view, they will see the famous "Bridge of Sighs" from the rear, as it frames the Pointe Paglia below it.

8. Campo S.S. Filippo e Giacomo
After crossing the Ponte Canonica, the procession goes along a narrow calle until it emerges into this small campo.

9. Campo S.S. Filippo e Giacomo
The exit from the campo is on the southeast corner.

10. Salizzada San Provolo
The salizzada, a wider street always intended as a shopping precinct, continues eastward from one island to the next, over the Rio del Vin.

11. Ponte San Provolo
The procession, still headed east, crosses the bridge.

12. Entry to Campo San Zaccaria
In order to mark off this precinct as the property of a convent, a religious sculpture was placed as an archway at the entrance to the campo. In crossing under, the procession is crossing a literal threshold.

13. View of San Zaccaria
The campo is in front of the church.

14. San Zaccaria and former convent
The former convent, marked by the filled-in arches, is at the left side of the picture, adjoining the church.

15. San Zaccaria
The doors of the church finally beckon to members of the procession. The lower level of the church's facade is faced in multiple colors of marble.

16. View back across Campo
On emerging from the church, after the service and ceremony have ended, members of the procession would see the other, unadorned, side of the archway over the entrance to the campo.


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