Water stairs are the interface between land and water. They can appear in private or in public contexts. A boat ties up next to the stairs, and then the passengers can step out onto the first dry step, which, of course, varies, as the canals are subject to the rise and fall of the tides.


1. Fondamenta Nani at bridge to Calle Toletta, Dorsoduro
2. Campo S. Martino, Castello
3. Rio dei Tedeschi: Ponte dell'Olio, San Marco
4. Rio della Celestia: Fondamenta del Cristo, Castello
5. Ponte Ruga Bella o del Forner, Santa Croce
6. Rio tera dell'Isola, Santa Croce
7. Rio della Muneghette, Santa Croce
8. Courtyard entrance, opposite Fondamenta Zen, Cannaregio


1. Fondamenta Nani at bridge to Calle Toletta, Dorsoduro
At their simplest, the steps descend into the canal in a straight line.

2. Campo S. Martino, Castello Frequently, steps appear next to bridges. This appears to have been at least partially a function of available open space. Here, you can see the mooring poles of the steps to the right of the bridge.

3. Rio dei Tedeschi: Ponte dell'Olio, San Marco
Sometimes, the steps get a fairly cramped placement.

4. Rio della Celestia: Fondamenta del Christo, seen from Campo S. Ternita
Water stairs can be curved, as in this example next to the Celestia in the Castello sestiere.

5. Ponte Ruga Bella o del Forner, Santa Croce

6. Rio tera dell'Isola, Santa Croce

7. Rio della Muneghette, Santa Croce
Although the steps are usually let into the canal edge broadwise, sometimes they run perpendicular to the canal-side, with a very narrow profile.

8. Water Stairs at courtyard entrance, opposite Fondamenta Zen, Cannaregio
Here the steps run directly down from a corte, or courtyard street.


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